Archive for the ‘spiritual law’ Tag

Earth Mysteries — 4 of 7 — the Law of Limits   2 comments

[Earth Mysteries 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7]

“Everything that exists is subject to limits arising from its own nature, the nature of the whole system of which it is a part, and the nature of existence itself.  These limits are as necessary as they are inescapable, and they provide the foundation for all the beauty and power each existing thing is capable of manifesting.”*

Though it’s not good New Age gospel to admit it, we’re faced with limits and boundaries all the time, and more to the point, that’s a good thing, for the reason Greer points out, and for others.  Limits are the counterweight, the resistance for our training, the sparring partner to keep us in fighting trim.  Rules change on other planes of existence, but to manifest power and beauty here, limits are absolutely essential.  They’re the valve that allows us to build up pressure in the boiler, the enclosure that intensifies the heat of the fire, the focus for the laser — or the conscious, persistent human intention that manifests a goal.

Physical limits allow us to give shape to things, and to have a reasonable expectation they’ll stay in that shape, usefully, predictably.  These rules don’t apply in the same way elsewhere.  All of us have had experience on, and of, at least one other plane, the astral, where most dreams occur.  You know how fluid and changeable the forms and shapes are there.  The dog chasing you morphs into a car you’re riding in with the person who bullied you in high school.  You look closely and that person’s hands aren’t holding the steering wheel any longer, but clutching a bouquet of flowers instead, two of which turn into ropes that winch you so tight you can’t breathe.  You struggle, wake up gasping, and — thank God! — you’re in your bed. It’s the same bed as last night, last week, last month, the bed which someone made years ago, and it stays put, reassuringly solid and unchanging beneath you, obeying the laws of this physical world.  You slowly come back from the feeling-sensation of your dream on the astral plane, welcoming the heaviness of your physical body around you, touching a few of the things here, pillows and sheets, your partner, a pet curled against your thigh or your face, the nightstand or wall beside your bed.  Familiar, stubbornly solid objects and beings, responding to gravity and inertia.  Yes, things mostly stay put here, in this world.  Though we all have stories about the car keys …

The image at the top comes from a site with its own take on freedom and limits.  What I find interesting is the image of flight presented as one of limitless freedom.  Yet flight depends on air, resistance, lift, momentum, wing span and area, an appropriate center of gravity, and so on.  Not everything stays aloft after you fling it into the air, and flight in a vacuum like in space follows different rules than flight in an atmosphere.  It can seem paradoxical that freedom increases the better we understand and work within limits.

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*Greer, John Michael.  Mystery Teachings from the Living Earth. Weiser, 2012.

Image:  glider.

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Earth Mysteries — 2 of 7 — The Law of Flow   Leave a comment

[Earth Mysteries 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7]

The second principle or law Greer examines is the Law of Flow.  Before I get to it, a word about spiritual or natural laws.  In my experience, we tend to think of laws, if we think of them at all, in their human variety.  I break a law every time I drive over the speed limit, and most of us have broken this or some other human law more than once in our lives.  We may or may not get caught and penalized by the human institutions we’ve set up to enforce the laws we’ve established, though the majority of human laws also have some common sense built in.  Driving too fast, for example, can lead to its own inherent penalties, like accidents, and besides, it wastes gas.

But spiritual or natural law can’t be “broken,” any more than the law of gravity or inertia can be “broken.” Other higher laws may come into play which subsume lower ones, and essentially transform them, but that’s a different thing.  A spiritual law exists as an observation of how reality tends to work, not as an arbitrary human agreement or compromise like the legal drinking age, or monogamy, or sales tax.  Another way to say it:  real laws or natural patterns are what make existence possible.  We can’t veto the Law of Flow, or vote it down, or amend it, just because it’s inconvenient or annoying or makes anyone’s life easier or more difficult.  There are, thank God, no high-powered lawyers or special-interest groups lobbying to change reality — not that they’d succeed.  Properly understood, spiritual or natural law provides a guide for how to live harmoniously with life, rather than in stress, conflict or tension with it.  How do I know this?  The way any of us do:  I’ve learned it the hard way, and seen it work the easy way — and both of these in my life and in others’ lives.  Once it clicks and I “get” it, it’s more and more a no-brainer.  Until then, my life seems to conspire to make everything as tough and painful as possible.  Afterwards, it’s remarkable how much more smoothly things can go.  Funny how that works.

OK, so on to the Law of Flow:

“Everything that exists is created and sustained by flows of matter, energy and information that come from the whole system to which it belongs and return to that whole system.  Participating in these flows, without interfering with them, brings health and wholeness; blocking them, in an attempt to turn flows into accumulations, brings suffering and disruption to the whole system and its parts.”*

“Participating in these flows, without interfering with them,” can be a life-long quest.  Lots of folks have pieces of this principle, and some of the more easily-marketed ones are available at slickly-designed websites and at New Age workshops happening near you.  But note that the goal is not to accumulate wealth beyond the wildest dreams of avarice.  (As Greer points out, if the so-called “Law of Attraction” really worked as advertized, the whole planet would be a single immense palace of pleasure and ease.  Though who would wait on us hand and foot, wash our clothes, make our high-priced toys, or grow and cook our food, remains unclear.)  Flow means drawing from system, contributing to it, and passing along its energy.  “Pay it forward” wouldn’t be out of place here.

If all this sounds faintly Socialist, well, remember that as Stephen Colbert remarked, “Reality has well-known liberal bias.” It means sharing, like most of us were taught as toddlers — probably shortly after we first discovered the power and seduction of “mine!”  But it could just as easily and accurately be claimed that reality has a conservative bias.  After all, these are not new principles, but age-old patterns and tendencies and natural dynamics, firmly in place for eons before humans happened on the scene.  To know them, and cooperate with them, is in a certain sense the ultimate conservative act.  The natural world moves toward equilibrium.  Anything out of balance, anything extreme, is moved back into harmony with the larger system.  The flows that sustain us also shape us and link us to the system.  The system is self-repairing, like the human body, and ultimately fixes itself, or attempts to, unless too much damage has occurred.

Ignorance of this law lies behind various fatuous political and economic proposals now afloat in Europe and America.  Of course, what’s necessary and what’s politically possible are running further and further apart these days, and will bring their own correction and rebalancing.  We just may not like it very much, until we change course and “go with the flow.”  That doesn’t mean passivity, or doing it because “everybody else is doing it.”  Going with the flow in the stupid sense means ignoring the current and letting ourselves be swept over the waterfall.  Going with the flow in the smart sense means watching and learning from the flow, using the current to generate electricity, or mill our grain, while relying on the nature of water to buoy us up, using the flow to help carry us toward our destination.  Flow is not static but dynamic, the same force that not only sustains the system, but always find the easier, quicker, optimum path:  if one is not available, flow carves a new one.  The Grand Canyon is flow at work over time, as are the shapes of our bodies, the curve of a bird’s wing, the curl of waves, the whorls of a seashell, the spiral arms of galaxies, the pulse of the blood in our veins.  Flow is the “zone” most of us have experienced at some point, that energy state where we are balanced and in tune, able to create more easily and smoothly than at other times.  Hours pass, and they seem like minutes. Praised be flow forever!

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Images:  river.

*Greer, John Michael.  Mystery Teachings from the Living Earth. Weiser, 2012.

Earth Mysteries — 1 of 7 — The Law of Wholeness   1 comment

[Earth Mysteries 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7]

Updated and edited 22 June 2017; 14 Dec 2017

Readers of this blog know I frequently quote John Michael Greer.  As a writer, blogger, and leader of another Druid order, he challenges me to dig deeper into my own order and understanding of Druidry, and examine its teachings more critically, as well as ponder the implications of his cultural criticism.  While his popular blog The Archdruid Report deals primarily with the consequences of Peak Oil, and offers productive strategies for thriving in the coming hard century or more of scarcity and turmoil, as we transition to a post-industrial age, most of his other writing centers on his spiritual journey until now.

As a case in point, his most recent book, Mystery Teachings from the Living Earth (Weiser, 2012), is a reimagining of The Kybalion*, published anonymously in 1912.  Greer asserts as his book’s underlying principle that “The laws of nature are the laws of spirit; this is one of the great secrets of the Mysteries.” He reworks the seven principles of the earlier book into insightful observations about spiritual ecology, framed as spiritual law.  Here’s the first one, the Law of Wholeness:

“Everything that exists is part of a whole system and depends on the health of the whole system for its own existence.  It thrives only if the whole system thrives, and it cannot harm the whole system without harming itself.”

The American myth of rugged individualism and self-reliance, part of the cultural story we Yanks have told ourselves over the decades, has served its purpose, and possibly run its course:  it may be more of an obstacle now, in an era when we need cooperation and interdependence more than we need stoic endurance.  We’re interconnected, and what I do affects you. One of my teaching colleagues always used to laugh at the idea of non-smoking sections in restaurants.  “It’s like imagining there’s a non-peeing end of the swimming pool,” he’d exclaim.  “A feel-good label doesn’t make it so.” I cannot harm myself without harming the whole system. But anyone buying wholesale into the myth of individualism doesn’t want to hear that.

Rather than seeing the divine as standing outside nature, here’s a way of perceiving the universe as a single immense feedback loop.  Suddenly the Golden Rule isn’t just a good moral guide, but also blindingly obvious common sense.  What you do comes back to you.  What goes around comes around — not because “God punishes me,” or because of “karma” or “sin” or anything other than what goes in, comes out.   Computer programmers know it as GIGO:  garbage in, garbage out.  Maybe it’s time for LILO:  love in, love out.  As long as we see the world as a collection of separate, discrete individuals rather than an interconnected series of networks, we’ll kill, abuse, pollute, steal, etc.  And likewise, as long as we believe that we should be free to do something that “doesn’t hurt anyone else,” we live in illusion.  Everything that each of us does matters to all the rest of us.  We’re interconnected, linked up to each other in astonishing ways that we’re only beginning to discover.

At first this seems to dump all the guilt for why things suck squarely on our shoulders, and a lot of people today are sick of guilt.  Rightly so:  it doesn’t accomplish anything except to poison the heart and to distract us from moving forward.  It’s only useful if it goads us into constructive action and that’s rarer than it should be.  But guilt isn’t the same thing as responsibility.  Accepting responsibility is the death of victimhood.  If I begin to see that everything I do has an effect, a consequence, then my life matters in a way it may never have seemed to matter before.

To put it another way and quote a Wise One, “If nothing we do matters, then the only thing that matters is what we do.”  In the midst of nihilism and cynicism and hopelessness, each word, thought, deed and feeling carries weight, shapes the universe for good or bad, and leaves a trail, a wake, a ripple, that will flow outward from my life now and also after I am gone.  I matter, and so do you, simply by virtue of being alive and here in this place, now.  To not choose to act, or to act foolishly and blindly is to waste a priceless opportunity to contribute to the commonwealth, the res publica, the Republic, this shared world of ours.

Who among us can deny that even small acts of kindness or cruelty committed by others have an effect on us out of all proportion to their apparent scale?  Can we then imagine for a moment that our own acts don’t set in motion a similar set of ripples?  We don’t have to be “big” to matter.  Love has no size.  Any is much.  Blessed be this life, gift to others and ourselves, chance to act, to love, to participate in the Web, to leave ripples at our passing, to vibrate the strands with our existence and choices, to play on life and pluck its melody, note by note.

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Image of Mystery Teachings:  Amazon.com

You can read the Kybalion online and download a PDF of it.

Image:  ripples.

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