Listening and the Land, Part 1   2 comments

snoctober

Much of my learning before and during the Bardic grade of OBOD Druidry has been about listening. I’ve walked different landscapes here and abroad over the last couple decades, and almost always when there are negative energies, they seemed to issue from human presences that felt negative to me, or disrupted the native energy. The land itself is simply the land, with all its other lives and forces and history and presences. It may not always feel comfortable or easy or familiar, but it has an integrity that asks me to pay attention.  And yes, I’ve done that with varying success.  But the human is always an overlay, unless the place has been inhabited for a very long time, and the humans there learned to attend to and respect the place they lived. Which is sadly not often enough, though places exist here and there which are dearly loved and cherished, places in which the land spirits dance their joy.

California Druid Gwynt-Siarad tackles this directly in his blog entry, “The Curious Case of American Land Spirits.”  I’ve taken the liberty of reposting the whole of his short entry here (Druids are always talking to beings they can’t see):

Recently I was involved in a discussion about land spirits. As the discussion progressed it touched on what I feel is a very important issue to us druids living in the Americas. That being, land spirits are more often then not, tied to the land and thus couldn’t come to us from Europe, and thus how do we treat with the spirits of this “new” land? The natives of this place have a long and good history of working with the land spirits here. Sadly, in most places, and certainly here on the west coast of the lower 48 the natives are almost completely gone. This is a very sad thing, but not the focus of this post. The question is, can those of us of European descent summon, honor, call, and treat with American land spirits? It was suggested that the spirits here are used to being summoned with certain type of ritual, that being those of the local natives. That the land spirits here have native names, and should only be addressed as such. ok…what if the name is not known, and can’t be learned? And what of the idea that they can only be summoned with native American style evocations? Where does this leave the modern druid? Even if I were able to learn, say the dances of the Umpqua Indians to summon the spirit of the Umpqua river, that would most likely be considered cultural appropriation and that’s just not P.C.

I have been tumbling these thoughts over in my head for several days now, and here is what I have come up with. First off, spirits are as individual in personality as people are. What might be ok with one spirit won’t be ok with another. How do we find out? I vote for good old fashioned trial and Error. Go out there and do what druids do in the way druids do it. If the spirit doesn’t like it, I am sure it will let you know, if you bother to listen. Let the spirits be our teacher. I think and feel with but a few exceptions so long as the spirits are approached with offerings, respect and love they are not going to be over critical if you said the right name, pronounced in the correct native dialect or be upset if you didn’t dance in the native way. Using a name the spirit is familiar with would be very helpful in treating with it, but not critical. So those druids that are inclined to work with such spirits, I say do your homework and get out there and get to know your spiritual neighbors!

No surprise that the spiritual world resembles this one — the spirits wish to be treated as individuals, because that’s what they are.  What of spirits of a species which was transplanted to the New World by Europeans?  Is it the “same” plant or animal?  The best way to find out, as Gwynt-Siarad observes, is to start the conversation.

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2 responses to “Listening and the Land, Part 1

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  1. This is a really great insight, and something that I’ve been working on/pondering for many years. I think too, that we might ask the spirits, show them we mean well, and build relationships over time. If we are able to do that, we can then learn how to call to them.

  2. Willowcrow, I agree that time is a key component. Our patience and persistence can overcome suspicion and downright lack of familiarity. It feels like we actually harmonize with each other, the spirits learning about us, just as we learn about them. It’s mutual.

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